The New I-9 Form: What You Need to Know

The New I-9 Form: What You Need to Know

This post has been contributed by our strategic partner Cascade Employers Association. Cascade is an exceptional, membership-based resource for Northwest employers committed to developing a strong, vital workforce. They offer a complete range of services — from hiring well, to training for excellence, to dismissing effectively. As of January 22, 2017, employers were required to start using a new I-9 form. While the new form has some great new features (it can function as a smart form), it looks and functions a bit differently than what you may be used to.  To help ease any confusion, you’re invited to watch this tutorial on completing the new form.  The tutorial takes you step by step through each section and answers the most common questions you may have about the new...
New I-9 Form Released

New I-9 Form Released

This post has been contributed by our strategic partner Cascade Employers Association. Cascade is an exceptional, membership-based resource for Northwest employers committed to developing a strong, vital workforce. They offer a complete range of services — from hiring well, to training for excellence, to dismissing effectively. On November 14, 2016 the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) published an updated I-9 Form. Although the previous version expired on March 31, 2016, employers were allowed to continue using that form until an updated version was made available.   Here are a few highlights of the new form: The form is provided in an electronic format to help reduce error. The electronic version includes helpful dropdown boxes, pop-up instructions and other prompts designed to make completing the form easier and more accurate. Employers may still use a paper version of the form. In Section 1 it asks for “other last names used” instead of “other names” used. It streamlines the certifications for certain foreign nationals. The form allows for multiple preparers or translators. It provides a dedicated area for additional information rather than putting it in the margins. A supplemental page for the preparer/translator is also provided. Updated instructions to help complete the new form. Employers must start using the new form no later than January 22, 2017. If you have any questions about the new I-9 form, please do not hesitate to contact Cascade....
Final Minimum Wage Rules Filed by BOLI

Final Minimum Wage Rules Filed by BOLI

This post has been contributed by our strategic partner Cascade Employers Association. Cascade is an exceptional, membership-based resource for Northwest employers committed to developing a strong, vital workforce. They offer a complete range of services — from hiring well, to training for excellence, to dismissing effectively. By Ryan Orr, JD, HR and Compliance Consultant Cascade Employers Association rorr@cascadeemployers.com On June 15, 2016, BOLI filed its final minimum wage rules. The primary subject of both the proposed and final rules is how to determine an employer’s location for purposes of the new minimum wage law. As a reminder, the law created three different minimum wage regions: Non-urban counties (Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa and Wheeler), the Portland Urban Growth Boundary, and everywhere else. The final rules use an entirely different method for determining an employer’s location than what was put forth in the proposed rules. Under the proposed rules, an employee would be paid at the rate of pay for the region where the employer is located, unless the employee worked more than an incidental amount of time in a different region. An incidental amount of time was defined as working less than four hours of compensable time in a region during any workweek. Additionally, driving through a different region with no employment or work-related stops was considered incidental. The final rules do away with the concept of incidental time. Instead, the rules create the concept of a fixed employer location. An employer can pay an employee based on the region where its fixed location is – regardless of whether work...