Audit & Assurance

We provide an unbiased look at your financial and operational situation with our Audit and Assurance services for nonprofit and privately held organizations.

Audit & Assurance Services include:

  • Audits, reviews and compilations
  • Financial statements—audits, reviews, compilations
  • Agreed upon procedures
  • Internal audits
  • Internal policies assurance
  • Retirement plan audits
  • Audit committee consulting
  • Forecasts and projections

Specialization
We offer specialized audit and assurance teams with in-depth experience in affordable housing, nonprofit organizations, financial institutions, healthcare providers and retirement plans.

Quality
We are committed to the highest standards in performing quality audits. Our commitment to quality and to the profession is illustrated by our participation as a reviewer in the American Institute of CPAs Peer Review Program.

 

We are proud to hold membership in the top industry assurance organizations:

American Institute of Certified Public Accountants

The AICPA represents the CPA profession nationally regarding rule-making and standard-setting, and serves as an advocate before legislative bodies, public interest groups and other professional organizations.

Governmental Audit Quality Center

The GAQC promotes the importance of quality governmental audits and the value of such audits to purchasers of governmental audit services.

Center for Audit Quality

The CAQ is an autonomous public policy organization dedicated to enhancing investor confidence and public trust in the global capital markets.

Employee Benefit Plan Audit Quality Center

The EBPAQC is a voluntary membership organization for firms that perform ERISA employee benefit plan audits, established to promote the quality of employee benefit plan audits.

“Accounting is really about people and building rewarding relationships.”

— Fritz Duncan, CPA, Partner & Shareholder

Audit & Assurance Team


Fritz Duncan, CPA

Fritz Duncan, CPA

Partner and Shareholder

Bio

Sara Hummel, CPA

Sara Hummel, CPA

Director of Quality Control

Bio

Evan Dickens, CPA

Evan Dickens, CPA

Partner and Shareholder

Bio

Jon Newport, CPA

Jon Newport, CPA

Partner and Shareholder

Bio

Kari Young, CPA

Kari Young, CPA

Senior Manager

Bio

Sarah Fantazia, CPA

Sarah Fantazia, CPA

Manager

Bio

Mathew Hamlin, CPA

Mathew Hamlin, CPA

Manager

Bio


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Recent News

Do You Know the Tax Implications of Your C Corp.’s Buy-Sell Agreement?

Do You Know the Tax Implications of Your C Corp.’s Buy-Sell Agreement?

Private companies with more than one owner should have a buy-sell agreement to spell out how ownership shares will change hands should an owner depart. For businesses structured as C corporations, the agreements also have significant tax implications that are important to understand.

Buy-sell basics

A buy-sell agreement sets up parameters for the transfer of ownership interests following stated “triggering events,” such as an owner’s death or long-term disability, loss of license or other legal incapacitation, retirement, bankruptcy, or divorce. The agreement typically will also specify how the purchase price for the departing owner’s shares will be determined, such as by stating the valuation method to be used.

Another key issue a buy-sell agreement addresses is funding. In many cases, business owners don’t have the cash readily available to buy out a departing owner. So insurance is commonly used to fund these agreements. And this is where different types of agreements — which can lead to tax issues for C corporations — come into play.

Under a cross-purchase agreement, each owner buys life or disability insurance (or both) that covers the other owners, and the owners use the proceeds to purchase the departing owner’s shares. Under a redemption agreement, the company buys the insurance and, when an owner exits the business, buys his or her shares.

Sometimes a hybrid agreement is used that combines aspects of both approaches. It may stipulate that the company gets the first opportunity to redeem ownership shares and that, if the company is unable to buy the shares, the remaining owners are then responsible for doing so. Alternatively, the owners may have the first opportunity to buy the shares.

C corp. tax consequences

A C corp. with a redemption agreement funded by life insurance can face adverse tax consequences. First, receipt of insurance proceeds could trigger corporate alternative minimum tax.

Second, the value of the remaining owners’ shares will probably rise without increasing their basis. This, in turn, could drive up their tax liability if they later sell their shares.

Heightened liability for the corporate alternative minimum tax is generally unavoidable under these circumstances. But you may be able to manage the second problem by revising your buy-sell as a cross-purchase agreement. Under this approach, owners will buy additional shares themselves — increasing their basis.

Naturally, there are downsides. If owners are required to buy a departing owner’s shares, but the company redeems the shares instead, the IRS may characterize the purchase as a taxable dividend. Your business may be able to mitigate this risk by crafting a hybrid agreement that names the corporation as a party to the transaction and allows the remaining owners to buy back the shares without requiring them to do so.

For more information on the tax ramifications of buy-sell agreements, contact us. And if your business doesn’t have a buy-sell in place yet, we can help you figure out which type of funding method will best meet your needs while minimizing any negative tax consequences.

 

© 2017

Individual Tax Calendar: Key Deadlines For the Remainder of 2017

Individual Tax Calendar: Key Deadlines For the Remainder of 2017

While April 15 (April 18 this year) is the main tax deadline on most individual taxpayers’ minds, there are others through the rest of the year that are important to be aware of. To help you make sure you don’t miss any important 2017 deadlines, here’s a look at when some key tax-related forms, payments and other actions are due. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you.

Please review the calendar and contact us if you have any questions about the deadlines or would like assistance in meeting them.

June 15

• File a 2016 individual income tax return (Form 1040) or file for a four-month extension (Form 4868), and pay any tax and interest due, if you live outside the United States.
• Pay the second installment of 2017 estimated taxes, if not paying income tax through withholding (Form 1040-ES).
September 15
• Pay the third installment of 2017 estimated taxes, if not paying income tax through withholding (Form 1040-ES).

October 2

• If you’re the trustee of a trust or the executor of an estate, file an income tax return for the 2016 calendar year (Form 1041) and pay any tax, interest and penalties due, if an automatic five-and-a-half month extension was filed.

October 16

• File a 2016 income tax return (Form 1040, Form 1040A or Form 1040EZ) and pay any tax, interest and penalties due, if an automatic six-month extension was filed (or if an automatic four-month extension was filed by a taxpayer living outside the United States).
• Make contributions for 2016 to certain retirement plans or establish a SEP for 2016, if an automatic six-month extension was filed.
• File a 2016 gift tax return (Form 709) and pay any tax, interest and penalties due, if an automatic six-month extension was filed.

December 31

• Make 2017 contributions to certain employer-sponsored retirement plans.
• Make 2017 annual exclusion gifts (up to $14,000 per recipient).
• Incur various expenses that potentially can be claimed as itemized deductions on your 2017 tax return. Examples include charitable donations, medical expenses, property tax payments and expenses eligible for the miscellaneous itemized deduction.

 

© 2017