Retirement Plan Audits

jones-roth-retirement-plan-auditsOur team performs employee benefit plan audits every year for all types of retirement plans across the Pacific Northwest.

We take our commitment to quality service, cost efficiency, timely communication, and technical expertise seriously. Our client promise is to issue benefit plan audits within 60 days of the information being provided and are willing to guarantee a delivery date in most situations. Serving all regions of Oregon from our offices in Bend, Eugene, and Portland, we provide audits for 401(k), 403(b), ESOP, Defined Benefit, and Health & Welfare plans.

We are a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants Employee Benefit Plan Audit Quality Center. Our clients are as small as 100 participants and as large as 14,000.

Contact us for a no-obligation fee quote for your retirement plan audit and/or a second opinion on your current services.

Read our recent post about Retirement Plan Audits.


Jones & Roth Retirement Plan Audits are lightning fast and stress-free.

“As one of the leading Retirement Plan Audit Firms in the Pacific Northwest, our promise is to deliver high quality work, on time, with efficiency that is cost effective.”

— Evan Dickens, CPA

Retirement Plan Audits Team


Evan Dickens, CPA

Evan Dickens, CPA

Partner and Shareholder

Bio
Jon Newport, CPA

Jon Newport, CPA

Partner and Shareholder

Bio
Mark Reynolds, CPA

Mark Reynolds, CPA

Senior Manager

Bio

Questions?

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Recent News

Now’s the Time to Starting Thinking About “Bunching” – Miscellaneous Itemized Deductions, That is

Now’s the Time to Starting Thinking About “Bunching” – Miscellaneous Itemized Deductions, That is

Many expenses that may qualify as miscellaneous itemized deductions are deductible only to the extent they exceed, in aggregate, 2% of your adjusted gross income (AGI). Bunching these expenses into a single year may allow you to exceed this “floor.” So now is a good time to add up your potential deductions to date to see if bunching is a smart strategy for you this year.

Should you bunch into 2016?

If your miscellaneous itemized deductions are getting close to — or they already exceed — the 2% floor, consider incurring and paying additional expenses by Dec. 31, such as:

• Deductible investment expenses, including advisory fees, custodial fees and publications
• Professional fees, such as tax planning and preparation, accounting, and certain legal fees
• Unreimbursed employee business expenses, including vehicle costs, travel, and allowable meals and entertainment.

But beware …

These expenses aren’t deductible for alternative minimum tax (AMT) purposes. So don’t bunch them into 2016 if you might be subject to the AMT this year.

Also, if your AGI exceeds the applicable threshold, certain deductions — including miscellaneous itemized deductions — are reduced by 3% of the AGI amount that exceeds the threshold (not to exceed 80% of otherwise allowable deductions). For 2016, the thresholds are $259,400 (single), $285,350 (head of household), $311,300 (married filing jointly) and $155,650 (married filing separately).

If you’d like more information on miscellaneous itemized deductions, the AMT or the itemized deduction limit, contact us.

© 2016

Combining Business and Vacation Travel: What Can You Deduct

Combining Business and Vacation Travel: What Can You Deduct

If you go on a business trip within the United States and tack on some vacation days, you can deduct some of your expenses. But exactly what can you write off?

Transportation expenses

Transportation costs to and from the location of your business activity are 100% deductible as long as the primary reason for the trip is business rather than pleasure. On the other hand, if vacation is the primary reason for your travel, then generally none of your transportation expenses are deductible.

What costs can be included? Travel to and from your departure airport, airfare, baggage fees, tips, cabs, and so forth. Costs for rail travel or driving your personal car are also eligible.

Business days vs. pleasure days

The number of days spent on business vs. pleasure is the key factor in determining if the primary reason for domestic travel is business. Your travel days count as business days, as do weekends and holidays if they fall between days devoted to business, and it would be impractical to return home.

Standby days (days when your physical presence is required) also count as business days, even if you aren’t called upon to work those days. Any other day principally devoted to business activities during normal business hours also counts as a business day, and so are days when you intended to work, but couldn’t due to reasons beyond your control (such as local transportation difficulties).

You should be able to claim business was the primary reason for a domestic trip if business days exceed personal days. Be sure to accumulate proof and keep it with your tax records. For example, if your trip is made to attend client meetings, log everything on your daily planner and copy the pages for your tax file. If you attend a convention or training seminar, keep the program and take notes to show you attended the sessions.

Once at the destination, your out-of-pocket expenses for business days are fully deductible. These expenses include lodging, hotel tips, meals (subject to the 50% disallowance rule), seminar and convention fees, and cab fare. Expenses for personal days are nondeductible.

We can help

Questions? Contact us if you want more information about business travel deductions.

© 2016

3 Strategies for Tax-Smart Giving

3 Strategies for Tax-Smart Giving

Giving away assets during your life will help reduce the size of your taxable estate, which is beneficial if you have a large estate that could be subject to estate taxes. For 2016, the lifetime gift and estate tax exemption is $5.45 million (twice that for married couples with proper estate planning strategies in place).

Even if your estate tax isn’t large enough for estate taxes to be a concern, there are income tax consequences to consider. Plus it’s possible the estate tax exemption could be reduced or your wealth could increase significantly in the future, and estate taxes could become a concern.

That’s why, no matter your current net worth, it’s important to choose gifts wisely. Consider both estate and income tax consequences and the economic aspects of any gifts you’d like to make.
Here are three strategies for tax-smart giving:

1. To minimize estate tax, gift property with the greatest future appreciation potential. You’ll remove that future appreciation from your taxable estate.

2. To minimize your beneficiary’s income tax, gift property that hasn’t appreciated significantly while you’ve owned it. The beneficiary can sell the property at a minimal income tax cost.

3. To minimize your own income tax, don’t gift property that’s declined in value. Instead, consider selling the property so you can take the tax loss. You can then gift the sale proceeds.

For more ideas on tax-smart giving strategies, contact us.

© 2016