Retirement Plan Audits

jones-roth-retirement-plan-auditsOur team performs employee benefit plan audits every year for all types of retirement plans across the Pacific Northwest.

We take our commitment to quality service, cost efficiency, timely communication, and technical expertise seriously. Our client promise is to issue benefit plan audits within 60 days of the information being provided and are willing to guarantee a delivery date in most situations. Serving all regions of Oregon from our offices in Bend, Eugene, and Portland, we provide audits for 401(k), 403(b), ESOP, Defined Benefit, and Health & Welfare plans.

We are a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants Employee Benefit Plan Audit Quality Center. Our clients are as small as 100 participants and as large as 14,000.

Contact us for a no-obligation fee quote for your retirement plan audit and/or a second opinion on your current services.

Read our recent post about Retirement Plan Audits.


Jones & Roth Retirement Plan Audits are lightning fast and stress-free.

“As one of the leading Retirement Plan Audit Firms in the Pacific Northwest, our promise is to deliver high quality work, on time, with efficiency that is cost effective.”

— Evan Dickens, CPA

Retirement Plan Audits Team


Evan Dickens, CPA

Evan Dickens, CPA

Partner and Shareholder

Bio
Jon Newport, CPA

Jon Newport, CPA

Partner and Shareholder

Bio
Mark Reynolds, CPA

Mark Reynolds, CPA

Senior Manager

Bio

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Recent News

Why it’s Time to Start Tax Planning for 2016

Why it’s Time to Start Tax Planning for 2016

Now that the April 18 income tax filing deadline has passed, it may be tempting to set aside any thought of taxes until year end is approaching. But don’t succumb. For maximum tax savings, now is the time to start tax planning for 2016.

More opportunities

A tremendous number of variables affect your overall tax liability for the year. Starting to look at these variables early in the year can give you more opportunities to reduce your 2016 tax bill.

For example, the timing of income and deductible expenses can affect both the rate you pay and when you pay. By regularly reviewing your year-to-date income, expenses and potential tax, you may be able to time income and expenses in a way that reduces, or at least defers, your tax liability.

In other words, tax planning shouldn’t be just a year-end activity.

More certainty

In recent years, planning early has been a challenge because there were a lot of expired tax breaks where it was uncertain whether they’d be extended for the year. But the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 (PATH Act) extended a wide variety of tax breaks through 2016, or, in some cases, later. It also made many breaks permanent.

For example, the PATH Act made permanent the deduction for state and local sales taxes in lieu of state and local income taxes and tax-free IRA distributions to charities for account holders age 70½ or older. So you don’t have to wait and see whether these breaks will be available for the year like you did in 2014 and 2015.

Getting started

To get started on your 2016 tax planning, contact us. We can discuss what strategies you should be implementing now and throughout the year to minimize your tax liability.

We’re Honored to be Voted #1

We’re Honored to be Voted #1

We are honored to be voted #1 by the 2016 Register-Guard Readers’ Choice awards in the category of Tax Preparation. Readers were asked to name their favorite local businesses for the 8th annual survey and more than 15,000 responded by nominating and voting.

Our Director of Human Resources and Career Coach Tricia Duncan, CPA accepted the award at the Readers’-Choice awards event.

Thanks to everyone who voted and thanks to the Eugene Register Guard!

What 2015 Tax Records Can You Toss After Filing Your Return?

What 2015 Tax Records Can You Toss After Filing Your Return?

The short answer is: none. You need to hold on to all of your 2015 tax records for now. But this is a great time to take a look at your records for previous tax years and determine what you can purge.

The 3-year rule

At minimum, keep tax records for as long as the IRS has the ability to audit your return or assess additional taxes, which generally is three years after you file your return. This means you likely can shred and toss most records related to tax returns for 2012 and earlier years.

What to keep longer

You’ll need to hang on to certain records beyond the statute of limitations:

• Keep tax returns themselves forever, so you can prove to the IRS that you actually filed. (There’s no statute of limitations for an audit if you didn’t file a return.)

• For W-2 forms, consider holding them until you begin receiving Social Security benefits. Why? In case a question arises regarding your work record or earnings for a particular year.

• For records related to real estate or investments, keep documents as long as you own the asset, plus three years after you sell it and report the sale on your tax return.

Just a starting point

This is only a sampling of retention guidelines for tax-related documents. If you have questions about other documents, please contact us.