Forensic Accounting

A special talent for information discovery and interpretation.

​We analyze information, provide clear explanations and explain the financial implications surrounding what we find. We assist attorneys and the court in a wide range of cases and investigations. Our role can involve fact finding, discovery, settlement negotiations, trial support and expert witness testimony. Our team combines our training as Certified Public Accountants (CPA), Accredited Business Valuators (ABV), Accredited Senior Appraisers (ASA), Certified Valuation Analysts (CVA), Certified Financial Forensics (CFF), and Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE). Every day experience and a tenacious spirit.

Our services include:

  • Alternative dispute resolution
  • Business valuations
  • Bankruptcy & insolvency
  • Economic damage claims
  • Financial investigations
  • Insurance investigations
  • Litigation consulting & expert testimony
  • Divorce

Forensic Accounting Team


William V. Mason, ASA, CPA/ABV, CFF

William V. Mason, ASA, CPA/ABV, CFF

Managing Senior Financial Analyst

Bio


Recent News

Jones & Roth Joins Surety Association of Oregon at Top Golf

Jones & Roth Joins Surety Association of Oregon at Top Golf

Friday September 8th, 2017 – The Construction team at Jones & Roth CPAs and Business Advisors was honered to attend the Surety Association of Oregon (SAO) sponsored Par-Tee at Top Golf in Hillsboro. Sureties, insurance agents, attorneys and accountants, met for golfing fun to hit balls assigned using microchip technology into targets.  The more accurate the shot and the farther the distance, the more points earned.  And of course drinks and appetizers only added to the entertainment.  It was a fantastic event, and a success in its mission to bring us together as professionals and get to know one another better.

SAO is a professional non-profit trade association for those engaged in the surety industry and related fields.  Quarterly luncheon meetings and activities are held, with its most popular event being the Holiday Party where they feature and bring awareness to a local charity and hold a holiday raffle.

Why You Should Boost Your 401(k) Contribution Rate Between Now and Year End

Why You Should Boost Your 401(k) Contribution Rate Between Now and Year End

One important step to both reducing taxes and saving for retirement is to contribute to a tax-advantaged retirement plan. If your employer offers a 401(k) plan, contributing to that is likely your best first step.

If you’re not already contributing the maximum allowed, consider increasing your contribution rate between now and year end. Because of tax-deferred compounding (tax-free in the case of Roth accounts), boosting contributions sooner rather than later can have a significant impact on the size of your nest egg at retirement.

Traditional 401(k)

A traditional 401(k) offers many benefits:

• Contributions are pretax, reducing your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI), which can also help you reduce or avoid exposure to the 3.8% net investment income tax.
• Plan assets can grow tax-deferred — meaning you pay no income tax until you take distributions.
• Your employer may match some or all of your contributions pretax.

For 2017, you can contribute up to $18,000. So if your current contribution rate will leave you short of the limit, try to increase your contribution rate through the end of the year to get as close to that limit as you can afford. Keep in mind that your paycheck will be reduced by less than the dollar amount of the contribution, because the contributions are pre-tax so income tax isn’t withheld.

If you’ll be age 50 or older by December 31, you can also make “catch-up” contributions (up to $6,000 for 2017). So if you didn’t contribute much when you were younger, this may allow you to partially make up for lost time. Even if you did make significant contributions before age 50, catch-up contributions can still be beneficial, allowing you to further leverage the power of tax-deferred compounding.

Roth 401(k)

Employers can include a Roth option in their 401(k) plans. If your plan offers this, you can designate some or all of your contribution as Roth contributions. While such contributions don’t reduce your current MAGI, qualified distributions will be tax-free.

Roth 401(k) contributions may be especially beneficial for higher-income earners, because they don’t have the option to contribute to a Roth IRA. On the other hand, if you expect your tax rate to be lower in retirement, you may be better off sticking with traditional 401(k) contributions.

Finally, keep in mind that any employer matches to Roth 401(k) contributions will be pretax and go into your traditional 401(k) account.

How much and which type

Have questions about how much to contribute or the best mix between traditional and Roth contributions? Contact us. We’d be pleased to discuss the tax and retirement-saving considerations with you.

 

© 2017

2017 OMGMA Conference Recap

2017 OMGMA Conference Recap

Thank you for joining us at the OMGMA fall conference last week. It was one of the best Healthcare conferences our team has attended, with powerful keynote speakers and sessions.  We had a tremendous turn out for our own session, presented by Brian Newton, CPA and Jeremy Prickel, CPA.

It was great to see so many of our clients and congratulations to the winner of our gift basket and our $100 Amazon gift card!

We received excellent feedback from everyone on our upcoming webinar series. We hope you are able to join us at our upcoming healthcare webinar scheduled for this Friday September 22nd.

To register: Healthcare Webinar: Top 7 Strategies for Successful Billing and Collections

We look forward to seeing you at the next conference!